Blog — KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

05. Shinkeinuki/ Ikejime | KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

Jon Klip KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

05. Shinkeinuki/ Ikejime | KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

Sashimi or “Otsukuri”, in the Kansai region of Japan, is fish eaten in a raw or almost raw state. The preparations for Sashimi are often simply butchering and slicing. The minute details that get lost in the cooking process come to the foreground when you are eating fish raw.After a fish dies, a whole bunch of physical and chemical changes start to affect the flavor and texture of the flesh. The most important of these processes is the softening of connective tissues. A bunch of enzymes in the fish start to break down the muscle fibers and proteins rendering the...

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04. Butchering Tai Fish | KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

Jon Klip KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

04. Butchering Tai Fish | KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

On the video, I am butchering Japanese sea bream called Ma Dai (鯛) in Japanese.This is one of the most popular fish to eat as sashimi in Japan, it has a wonderful firm texture and a perfect balance of fat and umami. This fish comes from Akashi, near one of the most famous fishings waters in Japan. Strong ocean currents in this area produce fish with firm flesh and clean flavour. To break down this fish, I am using a Japanese fish butchering knife called Deba (edge length 180mm). This is one of the most popular shapes for fish butchering...

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03. Usuba x Daikon | KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

Jon Klip KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

03. Usuba x Daikon | KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

  In this video I am peeling Daikon radish using a traditional Japanese Usuba knife. There are two different types of Usuba. One is Kanto Style which is mainly used in Tokyo and has a square tip. The one that I am using on the video is Kamagata Style which has a rounded tip, this type is mainly used in Kyoto and surrounding areas.   Kamagata Style Usuba Kanto Style Usuba Daikon radish is used often in traditional Japanese food and is a really popular vegetable to make garnishes with. In this video, I am making Tsuma which you will...

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02. Karasumi; 50 Days Later | KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

Jon Klip KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

02. Karasumi; 50 Days Later | KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

This will be a long post as I go through the step-by-step process for those who were asking.  Note: The first decision is buying the Borako (fresh mullet eggs). Depending on the method of slaughtering, the condition roe sacks can vary quite a bit. The Ikejime/Shinkenuki process will drain a great deal of undesirable blood out of the eggs, making the first few steps much easier.  Step 1: Purging the blood The remaining blood will turn black, bitter and foul smelling during the curing process. Get all the blood out! I use a needle attached to a faucet-hose to flush...

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01. Japanese Knife and Kitchen | KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

Jon Klip KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

01. Japanese Knife and Kitchen | KAISEKI APPRENTICE JON

Because of the long history of culture, even Japanese are often forgetting why we need to follow what it has been. Jon Klip is digging and teaching us why these Japanese style postures are existing and how good it is still to follow. 

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