LEGACY CRAFTSMANSHIP IN TOKYO: MORIHEI

history

Sakai, Sanjo, Echizen, Seki and Miki - these are places known for kitchen knife production in Japan. Sakai is best known for making 90% of Japan’s single bevel knives. But did you know that there were also many bladesmiths in Tokyo before? When speaking to anyone of that particular era in Japan, they will always remember the sounds of forging throughout Tokyo every day.

During the Edo period, Ieyasu Tokugawa, the head of the Edo Shogunate wanted to build a strong trade community where Edo would be filled with master craftsmen. As a result, Kajiya-cho (Blacksmith Village) was built, which is present-day Kanda district in Tokyo. Edo City was known for street fights and fires, so when fire broke out, the skilled blacksmiths would be responsible for creating the fine tools that the woodworkers would use to rebuild the damaged structures. After the Meiji period, swords were prohibited. Many swordsmiths were not able to find much work, so they turned to forging woodworking tools, farm tools and kitchen knives. Since Edo City was established, this tiny geographical space called Tokyo had one of the largest populations in the world, which resulted in many tight-knit communities. The communication between users and makers were a common part of every day, the gap between them was very small, if any. Any complaints about the tools by the users would quickly get back to the tool makers, which then resulted in many legendary blacksmiths, such as Chiyotsuru-Korehide (千代鶴是秀) and Ishido.

Chiyotsuru-Korehide with the Previous president of Morihei 千代鶴是秀と森平の先代社長

Chiyotsuru-Korehide with the Previous president of Morihei

Around 20 years after the end of World War II, Japan experienced a period of high economic and population growth. The sounds of forging became less welcomed in the streets and many blacksmiths had to move out of the city. Today, blacksmiths in and around Tokyo are rare, but a number still reside around the area, in cities like Saitama, Yamanashi and Chiba. When the city blacksmiths dispersed, they lost the union that they once had. Their work remains well respected, however and their history should be credited for putting Tokyo on the map for well-made forged tools.

Population is getting higher in Tokyo

Morihei has been a knife and whetstone supplier for more than 100 years. They are one of the few companies left in Japan with a long-standing history of relationships with blacksmiths and whetstone and natural stone makers that has been maintained to this day. At one time, more than 20 groups of blacksmiths and sharpeners worked under the name Morihei. When some of the blacksmiths decided to resign, Morihei asked them to make a large number of knives before they left, for those original Morihei’s customers who may wish to continue to use those same knives.

Craftsman used to work for Morihei

There is now a limited stock of those knives at Morihei who kept them safely in storage for the past 20 years. These are the final pieces from the blacksmiths in Tokyo from the Edo period. Each knife is stamped with the engraving Tokyo (東京). We are not sure how much longer we will have Tokyo-Made knives to sell, but we hope that each one will go to someone with a heartfelt sense of care for these knives.

Morihei

Morihei 1-28-6, Asakusa-bashi, Taito-ku, Tokyo, 111-0053, Japan
TEL:03-3862-0506 FAX:03-3861-0377
Business hours:10:00 - 17:45 (Weelend and holidays close)

Photographed, documented and written by: Hokuto Aizawa (Hitohira)
Edited by: Olivia Go (Tosho Knife Arts)


庖丁の産地といえば、大阪の堺、新潟の三条、岐阜の関または越前や三木などが有名で、とりわけ伝統的な和包丁に関しては堺の特産のように言われるが、昔は東京にも庖丁鍛冶を生業としている職人が、数多く存在していた。『昔はこのあたりでもカンコンカンコンとね、叩いている音がしてね。』と当時を知る人々は懐かしみながら話してくれる。

徳川家康が幕府を開き、江戸の発展とともに全国から集められ、集まってきた職人の中には、当然鍛冶屋も多く存在しており、彼らは東京・神田に今も地名として残る『鍛冶町』に住み込み江戸の発展を支えてきた。火事がよく起き、大工が仕事に困ることがなかったという江戸で、その大工を支える鍛冶職人達の腕が悪かったはずがなく、また、明治時代に入ると、それまで刀鍛冶だった者たちが廃業し、農具や大工道具等を作り始めた。そういった歴史の中で、培われてきた東京職人の鍛冶の技術の高さは、戦前、東京産の鋏が地方産の二倍以上値段がつけられていたという資料の中からも見ることが出来る。東京という狭い土地に、金が集まり、腕の良い多種多様な職人達が腕をせめぎあいながら仕事をこなしていたことも東京の職人たちの技術の向上に影響しただろう、大工や料理人などの使い手は、文句があれば直接売り手や鍛冶屋、研ぎ屋に注文を付けることが出来る、そういった人々の物理的な距離の近さは東京ならではであったであろう。そういった環境が千代鶴是秀や石堂といった伝説的な名鍛冶屋を生み出したといえるだろう。

Chiyotsuru-Korehide with the Previous president of Morihei 千代鶴是秀と森平の先代社長

千代鶴是秀と森平の先代社長

しかし、戦後20年を過ぎたあたりから、高度経済成長を迎え、街や生活が一変し始めた東京で、そのような人々の物理的な距離は鍛冶屋にとってだんだんと悪条件となっていく。騒音を発する鍛冶屋は、地方への移転か廃業を迫られるようになっていく。移転した鍛冶屋は現在でも埼玉や千葉、山梨などで鍛冶業を営んでいるが、東京周辺で移転することなく続けていた和包丁専門の鍛冶屋はそのほとんどが姿を消してしまった。堺や三条、越前のように集団的な協力関係をあまり持たずに、個々で仕事をこなしていた東京の庖丁鍛冶達は、歴史的に産地としてあまり有名になることもなく庖丁産業の表舞台から姿を消してしまった。

今度経済成長に伴い人工の増加する都市

東京で100年以上、刃物類の商売に携わってきた浅草橋の刃物・砥石問屋の『森平』は、当時から関東の鍛冶屋達と深い付き合いにあり、一時期は20を超える鍛冶屋や研ぎ屋が森平のために働いていた。鍛冶屋が廃業を決断すると、森平の店主はそこの庖丁を愛用している料理人達が困らないようにと、その後何年かはとっておける数だけの庖丁を作ってもらおうと注文する。そうすると、『森平のためなら』と言って鍛冶屋も数年、その注文をこなすために余計に仕事をしていった。

かつて森平のもとで働いていた職人たち

今回、森平の店主が倉庫から出してくれた庖丁は、20年ほど前に出した『最後の注文』の残りであり、江戸から続く東京の鍛冶屋たちの『最後の仕事』のひとかけらなのである。刀身のどこかに切られた『東京』という刻印は、そういった東京の職人達の誇りであり、東京という土地で腕を上げた職人たちに対する信頼の証でもある。残り、どれだけ人々にお見せすることが出来るかわからないが、江戸・東京にはかつて腕の良い鍛冶屋が何人もいた。そういった歴史の片鱗が、正しい人々の手に渡ることが、私たちの願いである。

森平

〒111-0053東京都台東区浅草橋1-28-6
TEL:03-3862-0506 FAX:03-3861-0377
営業時間:10:00 - 17:45 (週末・休日休み)

Photographed, documented and written by: Hokuto Aizawa (Hitohira)
Edited by: Olivia Go (Tosho Knife Arts)

Related Posts

INTRODUCING A TOOL AND NATURAL STONE SHOP: MORIHEI
INTRODUCING A TOOL AND NATURAL STONE SHOP: MORIHEI
Morihei(森平) is a knife and whetstone supplier located in Asakusabashi, Tokyo. They have been a part of the industry f...
Read More
SHOP: CUTLERY TSUBAYA
SHOP: CUTLERY TSUBAYA
The famous Kappabashi Dougu Street in Tokyo is world famous for restaurant supplies and food-related tools. The knife...
Read More
VIDEO: SHARPENING MUNETSUGU YANAGIBA
VIDEO: SHARPENING MUNETSUGU YANAGIBA
 Co-owner of Tosho Knife Arts: Ivan Gomez Fonseca is sharpening Munetsugu Yasuki High Carbon Yanagiba finishing with ...
Read More


Older Post Newer Post


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published